Guide to Med Spa in Los Angeles

Many people think of a med spa as a type of one-stop shopping for all their personal cosmetic needs. In theory, a med spa – short for medical spa – is a cross between a doctor’s office and a day spa, with all procedures carried out under the supervision and authority of a licensed medical doctor. The reality, however, is far from that.Med Spa in Los Angeles

Not all medical spas cater to the same clientele.

If you want to have a facial using the latest French products or a full back massage, then looking in the phone book and finding your nearest med spa is your best bet. But if you want anything more invasive, from having a laser hair treatment to trying out the latest chemical peel, it’s best to do your homework first.

Better Safe than Sorry

Visiting a med spa should be fun, relaxing and productive, and not result in a visit to the emergency room, infection or permanent scarring. While the non-invasive treatments carried out at most med spas have less risk of complication than full-on plastic or cosmetic surgery, serious injury could still occur. Ask these questions before you book an appointment:

Is there a doctor in the house? Med spa regulations vary from state to state. While medical treatments are, in theory, supposed to be carried out only with full medical supervision, often the doctor is not even on-site, let alone in the same room. And in some cases, unlicensed personnel with only the most rudimentary training in a specific procedure will be working on you. Make sure there is a licensed full-time medical director and nurse on-site – preferably in the room with you, or at least in a supervisory position overseeing qualified medical personnel. It’s advised that the doctor be either a licensed plastic surgeon or member of an affiliate group such as the American Society of Aesthetic Medicine.

Is staff experienced in specific procedures? A med spa may have ten years of experience overall – but only two weeks’ experience in the procedure you want to have carried out. Find out who your practitioner will be and ask how many times he or she has carried out the specific procedure you want – in the last year, month and week. Also, find out how often serious side effects occur – this should happen with less than one percent of the treatments provided. Finally, check credentials and ask about training and background. If staff appear insulted by your questions, go somewhere else.

Is the consultation up to standard? It’s no use visiting a med spa where personnel are condescending to their clients and questions are either brushed off or not allowed. Real med spas encourage their patients to ask as many questions as they need to until they feel entirely comfortable, and will give them up-to-date information to take home and leaf through in private. Consultations should be one-on-one with a medical professional, not a secretary, and should leave you feeling satisfied with the outcome, not uncomfortable or confused.

What is the equipment like? The equipment should not only be up-to-date, well-maintained and sterile, but there should be the right choice available for different skin types – different types of FDA-approved lasers, for example. There also be resuscitation equipment on hand, especially if the spa offers procedures such as varicose vein removal and deep chemical peels. The equipment should not only be clean but the entire facility should be hygienic, with proper hand-sterilizing facilities available for both guests and personnel. If the facility cannot afford to invest in quality equipment, you can’t afford to invest in them.

Are clients satisfied overall? Find out if patients return for repeat visits because they are so satisfied with the med spa’s reputation and practice, or if they vow never to come back again. Some med spas draw people in with seemingly cheap prices, but for some reason nobody ever returns. Find out why. If you are interested in one specific procedure, ask if the med spa can provide contact details of satisfied patients. A confident doctor would not mind doing this – or will have patients contact you.

Is the price right? Beware the bogus scams. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is – and if the price is way out of your reach, what’s the point? Med spa websites that make impossible promises or offer prices that are significantly cheaper than other places in the same area are usually not to be trusted. And remember, over-eager med spa personnel who want to sell you a series of treatments usually don’t have your best interest at heart (unless you’re impossibly ugly, that is). In most cases, their main goal is to make money.